Special exhibition

WOMEN WHO CHANGE THE WORLD
Heroines and witches?

Art by Agnete Brinch

29 May – 24 October

 

The exhibition is part of artist Agnete Brinch’s women’s empowerment project WOMEN WHO CHANGE THE WORLD. In this special exhibition the project is also connected to the theme of the Danish and European witch hunts.

The Danish debates in 2020-21 about #metoo, women’s roles and gender equality have, if anything, revealed that even today perceptions of women are deeply rooted in historical understandings of the world.
Here, the witch as a figure together with the witch persecutions of the 16th and 17th centuries play an often-overlooked role as cultural markers.
In the figure of the “witch”, history itself and later uses of history meet.

As a figure, the witch has contributed to a negative framing of women in certain gender roles, but since the 1970s an increasing number of women have also appropriated the figure as a form of “empowerment” – a way to actively position themselves outside society’s norms of what a woman is and should be.

In her project WOMEN WHO CHANGE THE WORLD, Agnete Brinch portrays a number of strong historical and contemporary female role models and puts into her own words how each individual portrait has inspired her.
In parallel, the museum reflects on the subject of heroines and witches? by looking at the connections between fact and myth, history and its use when it comes to the witch figure and its many layers of meaning.

In the hope of inspiring and raising awareness!

WOMEN WHO CHANGE THE WORLD
Heroines and witches?

Art by Agnete Brinch

29 May – 24 October

 

The exhibition is part of artist Agnete Brinch’s women’s empowerment project WOMEN WHO CHANGE THE WORLD. In this special exhibition the project is also connected to the theme of the Danish and European witch hunts.

The Danish debates in 2020-21 about #metoo, women’s roles and gender equality have, if anything, revealed that even today perceptions of women are deeply rooted in historical understandings of the world.
Here, the witch as a figure together with the witch persecutions of the 16th and 17th centuries play an often-overlooked role as cultural markers.
In the figure of the “witch”, history itself and later uses of history meet.

As a figure, the witch has contributed to a negative framing of women in certain gender roles, but since the 1970s an increasing number of women have also appropriated the figure as a form of “empowerment” – a way to actively position themselves outside society’s norms of what a woman is and should be.

In her project WOMEN WHO CHANGE THE WORLD, Agnete Brinch portrays a number of strong historical and contemporary female role models and puts into her own words how each individual portrait has inspired her.
In parallel, the museum reflects on the subject of heroines and witches? by looking at the connections between fact and myth, history and its use when it comes to the witch figure and its many layers of meaning.

In the hope of inspiring and raising awareness!